PBS

It's been a re-invention era for PBS and its president

Keywords

Somehow, we don't expect change at PBS. We expect the same faces -- from Fred Rogers to English kings -- to be there eternally. But during her 12 years as head of the network, Paula Kerger has brought a subtle transformation. Here's the story I sent to papers:

By Mike Hughes

Lately, PBS has been
asking people to name their favorite book.

Memorial Day eve concert: The statistics become real, human stories


Each year, PBS' "National Memorial Day Concert" -- on the eve of Memorial Day, actually -- offers a rich blend of music and tributes. It can have a strong impact on some viewers ... and on some participants. Here's the story I sent to papers:

By Mike Hughes

Many of us get the
general idea of Memorial Day, without the real impact.

Ready for more "Little Women"? Here are the basics

Keywords

The previous blog is a story I wrote about "Little Women," which runs on the next two Sundays (May 13 and 20) on PBS. Here's an extended box with some of the details:

-- When: 8-9 p.m.
Sunday, PBS; then 8-10 p.m. the following Sunday, May 20.

-- Follow-up: From
10-11:30 May 20, PBS reruns an “American Masters” portrait of
author Louisa May Alcott.

He's Bill Nye, the climate-change guy


For a while, Bill Nye was just a goofy guy wih goofy bow ties. He still has lots of the ties (about 500 of them) and still likes humor. But now, at 62, he's in the middle of dead-serious debates about climate change and more. Nye will be profiled in an interesting PBS documentary movie at 10 p.m. Wednesday; here's the story I sent to papers:

By Mike Hughes

Bill Nye has taught
kids many skills, including blowing things up and throwing things
down.

Fred Rogers: The quiet neighbor with an impish sense of humor


Here's a fun Fred Rogers story that I sent to papers ... or, actually, that I will send to papers, whenever the AOL mail becomes unbroken. It's about a dandy PBS special Tuesday, March 6

By Mike Hughes

Television has had
plenty of people with big ambitions and big voices. It also had Fred
Rogers.

It was a grand, golden age ... for one-percent of us


Yes, this is a big time for the commercial networks -- Grammys, Super Bowl, Winter Olympics, more. But PBS is countering with three nights of terrific documentaries. It's Winnie Mandela on Monday (Feb. 5), "The Gilded Age" on Tuesday and the oldest human remains in the Americas on Wednesday. Here's the "Gilded" story I sent to papers:

By Mike Hughes

Friends in an age of bias, they meet again after 75 years


It's time for some real-life stories that stir genuine emotion. When Ann Curry's "We'll Meet Again" debuts Tuesday (Jan. 23), it shows reunions of people who met during a time of World War II rage. Here's the story I sent to papers:

By Mike Hughes

For two decades,
Reiko Nagumo has told the story to schoolkids.

Anne brings red-haired chaos to a quiet, distant world


The new "Anne of Green Gables" movie arrives on Thanksgiving night, bringing low-key family fun. Here's the story I sent to papers.

 

By Mike Hughes

Today's young
readers and viewers know all about adventure.

Disney dreams -- and Broadway stardom -- do come true ... eventually


By Mike Hughes

The world, we're
told, is full of little girls with Disney dreams.

A few do star in
Disneyland, then retreat to non-glitter lives. One eventually
conquered Broadway.

Deep in the family roots, there's joy and agony


("Finding Your Roots" tends to be a fascinating journey through the lives of people's ancestors. This season's opener -- 8 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 3, on PBS -- is particularly good, finding joy and tragedy in the family trees of Larry David and Bernie Sanders. Other good ones are coming up; here's the story I sent to papers.)

By Mike Hughes