TV column for Wednesday, July 8


TONIGHT'S MUST-SEE:
“Key & Peele” season-opener, 10 p.m., Comedy Central.

At this year's White
House Correspondents Dinner, many people had their first encounter
with a brilliant comedy notion – the “anger translator.”
President Obama used calm, careful words ... and Luther
(Keegan-Michael Key) said (or raged) what he really meant.

It's an idea this
sketch show delivers often ... only with Jordan Peele as Obama.
Tonight, he and Luther meet Hilary Clinton. That's in a big night for
Comedy Central: Hannibal Burress' quiz show (“Why?) debuts at
10:30, followed by reruns of “The Daily Show” (with Bill Clinton)
and “The Nightly Show.”

TONIGHT'S MIGHT-SEE:
“Extant,” 10 p.m., CBS.

In this second
season, the show has put a couple major actors alongside Oscar-winner
Halle Berry. Last week, it added Jeffrey Dean Morgan (the “Magic
City” star and Joe DiMaggio in the Marilyn Monroe mini-series) as a
cop; now David Morrissey (the “Walking Dead” governor) plays a
respected general.

Tonight, Molly and
JD (Berry and Morgan) learn of another pregnant woman who has
inexplicable (and maybe fatal) symptons. Also, Julie (Grace Gummer)
struggles with Ethan's rebellion.

TONIGHT'S
ALTERNATIVE: “The Spoils Before Dying,” 9 and 9:30 p.m., IFC.

Last summer, IFC
gave us “The Spoils of Babylon,” a comedy mini-series with some
broadly funny moments. Now some of the same people are back with this
three-night, six-part film.

Will Ferrell –
whose Funny or Die produces this – again plays the author of a
tacky novel this is based on. Six other “Saturday Night Live”
people (led by Kristen Wiig and Maya Rudolph) are in the cast, along
with Michael Sheen, Haley Joel Osment and Michael Kenneth Williams
... playing a jazzman with 48 hours to clear his name. A sampling
shows there are (again) some great moments.

Other choices
include:

“America's Got
Talent,” 8 p.m., NBC. Before making their cuts next Tuesday, the
judges offer replays of some of their favorite auditions. That's
followed at 9 p.m. by a rerun (from June 29) of the “American Ninja
Warrior” try-outs from Pittsburgh.

“Melissa &
Joey,” 8 p.m., ABC Family. Here's a neat fantasy detour, sort of
like when “Happy Days” found Mork. Unfrozen a century after an
avalanche, Melissa and Joey find that Lennox and Zander are married
and living amid government control. A fairly funny series takes some
dandy twists.

“Baby Daddy,”
8:30 p.m., ABC Family. Amid some medical questions, Ben wonders who
would watch his daughter if he dies. That's followed, alas, by
overwrought, overacted moments.

“Modern Family,”
9 p.m., ABC. Sal (Elizabeth Banks) may not be ideally suited for
motherhood: In this rerun, she abandons her baby in the midst of a
belated baby shower.

“First Peoples,”
9-10 p.m., PBS (check local listings). The final piece of a
well-crafted, three-week series offers revisionist views of
Neanderthals: Their brains were larger than ours, but they may have
had few social impulses. Unlike our ancestors from that same era,
they lived only in small groups and left no hints of art or music.
Instead of dying out, they may have simply been absorbed by our
culture.

“Rain Man”
(1988), 9 p.m., Starz; or “North bt Northwest” (1959), 10 p.m.
ET, Turner Classic Movies. Here are triumphant moments in the careers
of, respectively, Dustin Hoffman and Alfred Hitchcock.

“Million Dollar
Listing San Francisco” debut, 10 p.m., Bravo. Propelled by tech
wealth, San Francisco property values have jumped by one-third this
show says. Now we meet two guys (one an Afghanistan native) who hope
to have a $50-million ales year ... and one who eyes $100 million.

TV column for Tuesday, July 7


TONIGHT'S MIGHT-SEE:
Shark overload, cable.

Three networks seem
to share cable's mission of frightening us each summer. AMC has the
Steven Spielberg classic “Jaws” (1975) at 7:45 p.m., with its
sequels at 10:45 p.m. (1978) and 1:15 a.m. (1983). NatGeo Wild reruns
“When Sharks Attack” episodes, from 7 p.m. to 2 a.m.

Then there's
Discovery, with its 28th annual Shark Week. After lots of
reruns, “Bride of Jaws” (9 p.m.) traces the creature –
estimated at 18 feet and 3,000 pounds – Australians have dubbed
Joan of Shark. At 10, “Sharks of Cuba” re-examines reports of a
23-foot great white, caught 70 years ago.

TONIGHT'S MIGHT-SEE
II: “Hollywood Game Night” season-opener, 10:01 p.m., NBC.

Last season, this
unassuming show got decent ratings and an Emmy, for Jane Lynch as
best reality host. Now it's back, this time as a summer series with a
big “America's Got Talent” lead-in.

Lynch again conducts
a pack of pop-culture games, with two regular people each joined by
three celebrities. Tonight has a married couple (singer John Legend
and model Chrissy Teigen), plus three actors – Jesse Tyler
Ferguson, Zachary Quinto and Jane Krakowski – and chef Giada De
Laurentiis.

TONIGHT'S
ALTERNATIVE: “American Experience,” 8 and 9 p.m., PBS (check
local listings).

Amid the current
agony in Charleston, S.C., viewers might want to visit Angelina
Grimke's life. She grew up there, the youngest of 14 chilldren of a
wealthy, slaveowning lawyer. She wrote a passionate piece for William
Lloyd Garrison's anti-slavery newspaper and became a strong
abolitionist speaker.

Grimke is one of
five people whose stories entwine in the three-part “The
Abolitionists,” which reruns tonight and next Tuesday. Others are
Garrison, author Harriet Beecher Stowe, militant John Brown and
Frederick Douglass, the escaped slave who became a centerpiece of the
movement.

Other choices
include:

“America's Got
Talent,” 8-10:01 p.m., NBC. Here's the seventh and final round of
regular auditions. Next week, the judges will decide who gets to the
live shows at Radio City Music Hall.

“NCIS,” 8 p.m.,
CBS. Stuck in the airport because of bad weather, Tony, Ellie and her
husband (Jamie Bamber of “Battlestar Galactica”) work a case
involving an elevated terrorist threat, in this rerun.

“Black-ish,”
8:30 p.m., ABC. In a rerun, Dre plans 15th-anniversary
vow-renewal. Things get complicated when his wife's parents (Beau
Bridges and Anna Deavere Smith) – the hippies who named her
“Rainbow” -- show up. They soon argue with his parents (Laurence
Fishburne and Jenifer Lewis).

“Zoo,” 9 p.m.,
CBS. On three continents, this animals-gone-wild crisis is growing.
In Botswana, Jackson rescues a friend and learns the lions no longer
show fear. In Los Angeles, Jamie and Mitch find a link to a bio-tech
firm. And in Paris, Chloe must confront her deepest fear.

“NCIS: New
Orleans,” 10 p.m., CBS. This rerun involves the murder of a petty
officer who was planning to propose. A search, however, finds no sign
that the girlfriend exists.

“Tyrant,” 10
p.m., FX. This hour took a fascinating twist after Jamal faked the
execution of his brother Barry, instead leaving him to die in the
desert. Rescued by Bedouins, he's decided it's too risky to get out;
for now, he'll stay in their village with a false identity ... while
his “widow” and kids deal with his will, back in Pasadena.
Meanwhile, Jamal is stunned by another family connection; also, an
idealistic young couple is rethinking a plan to flee the country.

“Hollywood Cycle”
debut, 10 p.m., E. In Hollywood, people will pay big money to ride
bicycles that go nowhere. Now this reality show follows the staff and
patrons at a stationary-cycle spot.

TV column for Monday, July 6


TONIGHT'S MUST-SEE:
“Penn & Teller: Fool Us” season-opener, 8 p.m., CW.

The world is
apparently full of great magicians who blend humor, deft moves and
sheer originality. This series – trying to concoct a trick that
baffles Penn and Teller – is filled with them tonight.

One guy keeps
transferring objects between a computer screen and real life; another
performs “surgery” to find proof amid someone's innards. And
Handsome Jack explains that his great beauty shouldn't blind us. (No
problem there.) He's fresh, fun, smart ... and thoroughly
Penn-worthy.

TONIGHT'S MUST-SEE
II: “So You Think You Can Dance,” 8-10 p.m., Fox.

TV's best reality
show reaches a turning point tonight. At the Las Vegas callbacks,
judges choose 10 people for the “stage” team and 10 for the
“street” team.

When the live shows
begin next week, they'll be led by gifted ex-contestants. Travis Wall
and Stephen “tWitch” Boss were runners-up in 2006 and 2008
respectively. Boss is a great street dancer; Wall, studio-trained,
has had four straight Emmy nominations for choreograpy. This could be
a great year.

TONIGHT'S
ALTERNATIVE: “The Fosters,” 8 p.m., ABC Family.

This isummer, Maia
Mitchell has had silly fun (and strong ratings) in “Teen Beach 2.”
But she's also been terrific here as Callie, a deeply layered teen,
surviving in foster care.

Tonight, she
convinces Brandon to accompany her on a mystery trip to Mexico. Back
home, his two foster moms have many woes: They argue about hiring a
contractor; they also find a pregnancy test.

Other choices
include:

“Garden State”
(2004), 7:10 p.m., Starz. Zach Braff (“Scrubs”) made a delightful
debut as a movie auteur, writing, directing and starring. From her
first monolog, Natalie Portman has a great character.

“The
Bachelorette,” 8-10:01 p.m., ABC. This is when things get tense
and/or spicy. There are five guys left and Kaitlyn Bristowe has to
choose the final three who will have what the show calls “overnight
dates.” We see the first of those dates, plus lots of rumors and
controversy.

“2 Broke Girls,”
8 p.m., CBS. In a rerun, Max and Caroline take out a loan, so they
can mass-produce their cupcake T-shirts.

“Scorpion,” 9
p.m., CBS. Suddenly, these computer guys have to be survivalists.
Their helicopter crashes, igniting a wildfire that could trap them.

“POV,” 10 p.m.,
PBS (check local listings). Last week, this documentary series left
us watching a man's world crumble; this time, we see several lives
wobble. We follow two people – a Seattle man, a New York woman –
trying to overcome past errors and retrieve their kids from the
foster-care system. It's a tough ride, but an informative (and,
occasionally, uplifting) one.

“The Whispers,”
10:01 p.m., ABC. When Claire assembles children who have heard from
“Drill” (the scheming, disembodied voice), she makes a key
breakthrough. Meanwhile, Wes studies the mysterious rock in Mali and
has a disturbing idea of Drill's master plan.

“The Island”
finale, 10:01 p.m., NBC. A darker version of “Survivor,” this
dumped 14 guys on an island with no food or water and with no fun and
games. Now the brief (six-episode) series ends; survivalist Bear
Grylls visits the men at the end of their 28-day stay, to see how
they're doing.

TV column for Sunday, July 5


TONIGHT'S MUST-SEE:
“Shark Week” and “Shark Fest,” 8 p.m., Discovery and NatGeo
Wild.

For 27 summers,
Discovery has given us a week of sharks chasing, chomping and even
leaping. Now the 28th one starts with tagging sharks in
Cape Cod and following their route to Florida.

A 9 p.m. film visits
the island of Guadalupe; a 10 p.m. one studies the fastest sharks,
the “monster mako.” New hours (mainly 9-11:30 p.m.) will continue
through next Sunday. And now there's a copy: NatGeo launches the
third year of its “Shark Fest,” through Thursday.

TONIGHT'S MUST-SEE
II: “Masterpiece: Poldark,” 9 p.m., PBS (check local listings).

Many networks avoid
new episodes on the holiday weekend. (Three shows -- “The Strain,”
“Ray Donovan” and “Masters of Sex” -- start their seasons
next week.) But PBS and HBO boom ahead.

For PBS, Ross
Poldark has pivotal moments – re-opening the mine ... changing the
relationship with the waif who became his maid ... and confronting a
cruel judge. That confrontation has Aidan Turner (as Poldark)
battling Robin Ellis ... who played Poldark back in 1975.

TONIGHT'S
ALTERNATIVE: Soccer, 7 p.m. ET, Fox.

This turns out to be
a rematch of the last Women's World Cup, with Japan and the U.S.

The Americans lost
that one (in 2011), but this time they have a strong shot. They're
riding a string of five straight shut-outs, including Tuesday's 2-0
win over top-ranked Germany.

Other choices
include:

Movies, Turner
Classic Movies. Two big 1961 films -- “The Misfits” (with Marilyn
Monroe and Clark Gable) and “West Side Story” -- are at 3 and
5:15 p.m. ET, followed by comedy classics – the Marx Brothers'
“Duck Soup” (1933) at 8 p.m. ET and Charlie Chaplin's “The
Great Dictator” (1940) at 9:30.

“Celebrity Family
Feud,” 8 and 8:30 p.m., ABC. The first round pits the family of
Phil McGraw (of “Dr. Phil” fame) against a team led by
brother-sister comedy masters Garry and Penny Marshall. Then two
teams are led by different generations – Kevin McHale (“Glee”),
27, and Fred Willard, 75.

“Big Brother,”
8:01 p.m., CBS. Fresh from the first eviction on Thursday, a new
round begins.

“Zoo” and
“Extant,” 9 and 10 p.m., CBS. Here are quick reruns of this
week's episodes – the debut of “Zoo” on Tuesday and the
season-opener of “Extant” on Wednesday.

“True Detective,”
9 p.m. Sunday, HBO. Ani (Rachel McAdams) chastises Ray (Colin
Ferrell) for going rogue; Paul (Taylor Kitsch) does legwork and Frank
(Vince Vaughn) tries to meet his old crime colleagues. That's
followed by new comedy episodes -- “Ballers” at 10, “The Brink”
at 10:30.

“The Crimson
Field,” 10 p.m., PBS (check local listings). Next Thursday (on the
debut of “Dates” on CW), viewers will see a remarkable
performance by Oona Chaplin (Charlie's granddaughter, Eugene
O'Neill's great-granddaughter). First, we can catch her starring here
as Kitty, a World War I nurse. Tonight, Thomas realizes he has a
growing attraction to her; also, Sister Joan reveals a dark secret.

“Penny Dreadful”
season finale, 10 p.m., Showtime, rerunning at 11 p.m. and midnight.
Vanessa battles the demon. That follows a rerun of the season,
beginning at 1 p.m.

 

 

 

 

TONIGHT'S MUST-SEE:
“Shark Week” and “Shark Fest,” 8 p.m., Discovery and NatGeo
Wild.

For 27 summers,
Discovery has given us a week of sharks chasing, chomping and even
leaping. Now the 28th one starts with tagging sharks in
Cape Cod and following their route to Florida.

A 9 p.m. film visits
the island of Guadalupe; a 10 p.m. one studies the fastest sharks,
the “monster mako.” New hours (mainly 9-11:30 p.m.) will continue
through next Sunday. And now there's a copy: NatGeo launches the
third year of its “Shark Fest,” through Thursday.

TONIGHT'S MUST-SEE
II: “Masterpiece: Poldark,” 9 p.m., PBS (check local listings).

Many networks avoid
new episodes on the holiday weekend. (Three shows -- “The Strain,”
“Ray Donovan” and “Masters of Sex” -- start their seasons
next week. But PBS and HBO boom ahead.

For PBS, Ross
Poldark has pivotal moments – re-opening the mind ... changing the
relationship with the waif who became his maid ... and confronting a
cruel judge. The confrontation has the new Poldark (Aidan Turner)
battling Robin Ellis ... who had the same role in 1975.

TONIGHT'S
ALTERNATIVE: Soccer, 7 p.m. ET, Fox.

It was a risky move
by Fox, scheduling the Women's World Cup finals for prime time,
without knowing if the U.S. would be there. In the six previous Cups,
the U.S. has reached the finals three times (winning in 1991 and '99,
losing in 2011) and has finished third the other times.

But the gamble
worked. With Hope Solo as goalie, the Americans now have had five
straight shut-outs. That peaked with Tuesday's 2-0 win over
top-ranked Germany; now they go for the championship.

Other choices
include:

Movies, Turner
Classic Movies. Two big 1961 films -- “The Misfits” (with Marilyn
Monroe and Clark Gable) and “West Side Story” -- are at 3 and
5:15 p.m. ET, followed by comedy classics – the Marx Brothers'
“Duck Soup” (1933) at 8 p.m. ET and Charlie Chaplin's “The
Great Dictator” (1940) at 9:30.

“Celebrity Family
Feud,” 8 and 8:30 p.m., ABC. The first round pits the family of
Phil McGraw (of “Dr. Phil” fame) against brother-sister comedy
masters Garry and Penny Marshall and their kin. Then two teams are
led by different generations – Kevin McHale (“Glee”), 27, and
Fred Willard, 75.

“Big Brother,”
8:01 p.m., CBS. Fresh from the first eviction on Thursday, a new
round begins.

“Zoo” and
“Extant,” 9 and 10 p.m., CBS. Here are quick reruns of this
week's episodes – the debut of “Zoo” on Tuesday and
season-opener of “Extant” on Wednesday.

“True Detective,”
9 p.m. Sunday, HBO. Ani (Rachel McAdams) chastises Ray (Colin
Ferrell) for going rogue; Paul (Taylor Kitsch) does legwork and Frank
(Vince Vaughn) tries to meet his old crime colleagues. That's
followed by new comedy episodes -- “Ballers” at 10, “The Brink”
at 10:30.

“The Crimson
Field,” 10 p.m., PBS (check local listings). Next Thursday (on the
debut of “Dates” on CW), viewers will see a remarkable
performance by Oona Chaplin (Charlie's granddaughter, Eugene
O'Neill's great-granddaughter). First, we can catch her starring here
as Kitty, a World War I nurse. Tonight, Thomas realizes he has a
growing attraction to her; also, Sister Joan reveals a dark secret.

“Penny Dreadful”
season finale, 10 p.m., Showtime, rerunning at 11 p.m. and midnight.
Vanessa battles the demon. That follows a rerun of the season,
beginning at 1 p.m.

 

TONIGHT'S MUST-SEE:
“Shark Week” and “Shark Fest,” 8 p.m., Discovery and NatGeo
Wild.

For 27 summers,
Discovery has given us a week of sharks chasing, chomping and even
leaping. Now the 28th one starts with tagging sharks in
Cape Cod and following their route to Florida.

A 9 p.m. film visits
the island of Guadalupe; a 10 p.m. one studies the fastest sharks,
the “monster mako.” New hours (mainly 9-11:30 p.m.) will continue
through next Sunday. And now there's a copy: NatGeo launches the
third year of its “Shark Fest,” through Thursday.

TONIGHT'S MUST-SEE
II: “Masterpiece: Poldark,” 9 p.m., PBS (check local listings).

Many networks avoid
new episodes on the holiday weekend. (Three shows -- “The Strain,”
“Ray Donovan” and “Masters of Sex” -- start their seasons
next week. But PBS and HBO boom ahead.

For PBS, Ross
Poldark has pivotal moments – re-opening the mind ... changing the
relationship with the waif who became his maid ... and confronting a
cruel judge. The confrontation has the new Poldark (Aidan Turner)
battling Robin Ellis ... who had the same role in 1975.

TONIGHT'S
ALTERNATIVE: Soccer, 7 p.m. ET, Fox.

It was a risky move
by Fox, scheduling the Women's World Cup finals for prime time,
without knowing if the U.S. would be there. In the six previous Cups,
the U.S. has reached the finals three times (winning in 1991 and '99,
losing in 2011) and has finished third the other times.

But the gamble
worked. With Hope Solo as goalie, the Americans now have had five
straight shut-outs. That peaked with Tuesday's 2-0 win over
top-ranked Germany; now they go for the championship.

Other choices
include:

Movies, Turner
Classic Movies. Two big 1961 films -- “The Misfits” (with Marilyn
Monroe and Clark Gable) and “West Side Story” -- are at 3 and
5:15 p.m. ET, followed by comedy classics – the Marx Brothers'
“Duck Soup” (1933) at 8 p.m. ET and Charlie Chaplin's “The
Great Dictator” (1940) at 9:30.

“Celebrity Family
Feud,” 8 and 8:30 p.m., ABC. The first round pits the family of
Phil McGraw (of “Dr. Phil” fame) against brother-sister comedy
masters Garry and Penny Marshall and their kin. Then two teams are
led by different generations – Kevin McHale (“Glee”), 27, and
Fred Willard, 75.

“Big Brother,”
8:01 p.m., CBS. Fresh from the first eviction on Thursday, a new
round begins.

“Zoo” and
“Extant,” 9 and 10 p.m., CBS. Here are quick reruns of this
week's episodes – the debut of “Zoo” on Tuesday and
season-opener of “Extant” on Wednesday.

“True Detective,”
9 p.m. Sunday, HBO. Ani (Rachel McAdams) chastises Ray (Colin
Ferrell) for going rogue; Paul (Taylor Kitsch) does legwork and Frank
(Vince Vaughn) tries to meet his old crime colleagues. That's
followed by new comedy episodes -- “Ballers” at 10, “The Brink”
at 10:30.

“The Crimson
Field,” 10 p.m., PBS (check local listings). Next Thursday (on the
debut of “Dates” on CW), viewers will see a remarkable
performance by Oona Chaplin (Charlie's granddaughter, Eugene
O'Neill's great-granddaughter). First, we can catch her starring here
as Kitty, a World War I nurse. Tonight, Thomas realizes he has a
growing attraction to her; also, Sister Joan reveals a dark secret.

“Penny Dreadful”
season finale, 10 p.m., Showtime, rerunning at 11 p.m. and midnight.
Vanessa battles the demon. That follows a rerun of the season,
beginning at 1 p.m.

 

TV column for Saturday, July 4


TONIGHT'S MUST-SEE:
Fourth-of-July concerts, 8 p.m., NBC and PBS.

This may be what TV
does best – big crowds, big music and (of course) fireworks. NBC is
in New York, repeating highlights at 10 p.m.; PBS is in Washington,
repeating (check local listings) at 9:30.

NBC has music by
Kelly Clarkson, Brad Paisley, Dierks Bentley, Meghan Trainor and Flo
Rida. PBS has it all – pop and rock (Barry Manilow, Nicole
Scherzinger, KC and the Sunshine Band), country (Alabama, Hunter
Hayes, Meghan Linsey) and classical (Lang Lang, Ronan Tynan).

TONIGHT'S MIGHT-SEE:
“The Millers” (8 and 8:30 p.m.) and “The McCarthys” (9 and
9:30 p.m.) return, CBS.

Both shows have been
part of CBS' Thursday comedy juggernaut. They weren't good enough for
that ... but they're terrific by Saturday standards; now their final
new episodes will be shown this month.

First, Nathan Miller
(Will Arnett) frets about his cameraman (J.B. Smoove) taking another
job; also, Nathan's mom confronts her work nemesis (Molly Shannon).
Then the McCarthys try to be independent from their parents; also,
Gerard (Joey McIntyre) misses his own engagement party.

TONIGHT'S
ALTERNATIVE: “The Astronaut Wives Club,” 8 p.m., ABC.

This rerun begins
with Deke Slayton enraged. He's been scrubbed from a mission because
of a heart murmur ... even though officials have known of the problem
for years.

That's the start of
an hour that skillfully mixes history and soap-opera. The Glenns –
John and the painfully shy Annie – remain likable; the Coopers
remain in a tenuous, platonic marriage. And we get to know the
Carpenters, free-thinkers in a place where that was rare and
discouraged.

Other choices
include:

“Sons of Liberty,”
noon to 6 p.m., History; repeats from 6 p.m. to midnight. On July 4,
we can catch a mini-series rerun that shows how this all began. In
Massachusetts, the charismatic Sam Adams links with businessman John
Hancock. Soon, they have a rag-tag army, while Ben Franklin tries to
get other colonies involved. We also meet Paul Revere, George
Washington, Dr. Joseph Warren and more.

“Power,” noon to
midnight, Starz. There's no new episode today, but you can catch up
on everything else. The first season starts reruns at noon, with the
four second-season ones beginning at 8:05 p.m. Slick, sleek and
violent, this sees a drug kingpin – a tough guy to know or like --
become a nightclub owner, while having an affair with his childhood
sweetheart, now an assistant district attorney.

“Steel Magnolias”
(1989), 6:30 p.m., and “Forrest Gump” (1994), 9 p.m., ABC Family.
Here's a dandy double feature, with movies that manage to mix warmth,
humor, tragedy and (for “Gump”) whimsy.

“Scream,” 8
p.m., MTV. Just in case we missed it Tuesday, here's the debut of the
series based loosely on the popular scare films.

“20/20,” 9-11
p.m., ABC. This reruns the April interview Diane Sawyer had with
Bruce Jenner, shortly before he began transitioning into Caitlyn
Jenner.

“Atlantis” and
“Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell,” 9 and 10 p.m., BBC America.
Some shows avoid having new episodes on the holiday, but these two
boom ahead. First, Jason faces execution for killing the Oracle; then
Jonathan Strange tries to cure the madness of King George III.

“Saturday Night
Live,” 11:29 p.m., NBC. Amy Adams hosts this rerun, with music from
One Direction.